Robyn Rosenfeldt, founding publisher & editor

Where do you live, and on what sort of property?

I live in Pambula on a two and a half acre property on the edge of town.  I live here with my partner, my three beautiful children, and at last count three sheep, four chickens a rooster and five ducks.

How did you get into permaculture?

I got into permaculture through a love of gardening and growing my own food but soon realised permaculture was so much more than gardening. After completing my PDC (permaculture design certificate) I realised it was my mission to combine my passion for permaculture with my love of publishing, photography and writing and create Pip Magazine.

What do you do for Pip?

I started Pip. Pip is my baby and I am the publisher, editor, art director, photographer, writer, book keeper and tea lady.

What’s next in your permaculture journey?

My property is a work in progress. Between creating a magazine and looking after my family I spend time growing food and creating a beautiful space to live in. To keep me sane among all my commitments I surf and do yoga.


Emily Stokes, assistant editor

Where do you live, and on what sort of property?

I live in Candelo with my family plus our milking cows, beef cattle, horses, goats and chickens on 150acres of African lovegrass and European blackberry. Hence our major project of regenerating our soil has many challenges. We try to grow a lot of our own food and swap within our community.

How did you get into permaculture?

My partner learnt about permaculture in Tasmania in the 90s. We have lots of permaculture books on our shelves and I finally did a PDC a few years ago. One of my other joys is fermenting – we named our property ‘Fermaculture Farm’ to incorporate two of my favourite things.

What do you do for Pip?

Research, write, commission and edit articles. I’ve been writing freelance for a number of years and I’m very happy to have two of my passions converge; writing and sustainable lifestyles.

What’s next in your permaculture journey?

In my PDC I did a site design for our property. We are slowly putting the design into action and it’s great to keep looking back at the plan and see that we have actually done something – cos it’s (did I mention it already?) slow….slow living!


Mel Page, office manager & business support

Where do you live, and on what sort of property?

In the countryside near Pambula, my family has a 45-acre property, a few cows, five chickens, two rabbits, two orchards and a dog.

How did you get into permaculture?

Once upon a time I lived at Crystal Waters Permaculture Village in Queensland. Now as an adult, landowner and mother, I am building on my interest for sustainable living and the wonders of creating your own produce with your children by your side.

What do you do for Pip?

Whatever the Pip team needs in admin tasks and business support to help them write, create and publish the content that inspires so many people.

What’s next in your permaculture journey?

Never ending learning and getting dirt on my hands in the garden. With some land, a creative mind and wonderful role models, the sky’s the limit.

 


Maude Farrugia, artist and editorial contributor

Where do you live, and on what sort of property?

I live on Wurundjeri land, in a little house on top of a big hill in Melbourne’s north. We live on one sixteenth of an acre, and we try to make every little bit of our patch as permaculture productive as possible. I live with my partner, two kids, chooks, quails and bees surrounded by a wonderful neighbourhood.

How did you get into permaculture?

I found John Seymour’s “Fat of the Land” in an op-shop when I was sixteen and decided there and then that I wanted to be a subsistence farmer. Since then I’ve been on a journey of Wwoofing on farms, starting community gardens and living in the country before finally finding my way back to my place in the (edible) urban jungle.

What do you do for Pip?

I write, doodle and cook up ideas for our Pip blog and magazine.

What’s next in your permaculture journey?

Our family are starting a microbakery from our back-room this year, and helping launch a food co-op and School Strike climate justice group in our local area. As well as working hard to finish retroburbia-fying our house and garden in our spare time of course!

 


Emma Gibbs, communications and content manager

Where do you live, and on what sort of property?

I live in an inner suburb of Melbourne with my husband, three-year-old son and two cats. My son would also count the worms from our worm farm as his “pets”!

How did you get into permaculture?

I stumbled upon Pip and the world of permaculture via way of the zero waste movement. A few years ago we started living a sustainable lifestyle, dramatically reducing the amount of household waste we produce and avoiding plastic wherever possible.

This led to growing some of our own food, composting, installing solar, and striving to reduce our family’s overall carbon footprint.

What do you do for Pip?

I’m responsible for managing Pip’s online content, social media channels, PR and occasionally writing the odd article.

What’s next in your permaculture journey?

I’d love to complete a permaculture design certificate as we are planning on moving to acreage sometime in the future and I’d love to put these skills to use on our own property. Getting some chickens is also on the wish list, among many other things!